Bathtub-pilots saved miraculously by instruction manual. By William Van Zyl. Published in January 2022.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-xgu7v-116beac

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Read the full story and article in a blog post:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/12/23/bathtub-pilots-saved-miraculously-by-instruction-manual/

Excerpt:

The bathtub plane flew like a giant concrete brick, shaking and vibrating violently through the air. Two babies took off from the bathroom floor without wings – the bath flight baffled aeronautical engineers. The structures around them rattled, shook, and then disintegrated. The entire house exploded from the pressure of the hurricane. The timber struts, trusses, studs, and bracing collapsed like matchsticks in the powerful force of the storm. Once a beautiful family home, the dislodged timber swirled for a couple of seconds before it was swooped into the air for tens of meters. Only the concrete floor remained. When the bath-plane received enough momentum: it took off with a 3-month and 15-month old baby pilot inside.  

Someone had given them an emergency manual. It was sitting neatly between the two tiny pilots swaddled in blankets and pillows. They were well prepared for their journey. They had no idea when and where they would land. All they had with them was the instruction manual. The shocking thing – only discovered after the miraculous touchdown – was that they could not see properly out of the bath to navigate where they were heading. The two wee aero-pioneers could have possibly communicated using limited baby language.

They took off at a moment’s notice with devastating force. And, then they landed after a very short flight at an arm-breaking speed. Luckily the swaddling and pillows supported their heads and necks as the bath-plane rocketed from the concrete floor of the bathroom up into the air.

 

Excerpt 2:

“From which airport did the baby pilots take off? “

“Where were the pilots heading?

As the rescuers paged through the manual, they found some maps at the back of the book.

“Are these two from Israel”

‘Must be, the maps show details around Israel.”

Could they be from Israel? All the maps in the manual – at the back of the book – were of Israel. The rescuers were mystified.

I have included this section on Israel to add some humour to the story – it is not true. However, most Bibles have maps of Israel at the back or in the front.

—————0———————

When the rescuers handed the two brave pilots to their nana – Clara Lutz – she was overjoyed.

“When the hurricane struck, I held onto the bath; however, the force of the winds was so powerful it ripped the bath out of the floor and launched it into the night sky. I believed that the blanket, pillow and the big Black Book would keep them safe,” said Lutz.

—————0——————-

I have written this introduction to this story from my perspective. It is my interpretation of the true story that occurred days ago. The stunning true story was published on 17 December.  A Hopkins County (US) woman was looking after her two infant grandchildren that Friday night.

“I was looking everywhere to see where the tub may be. I had no clue at all where these babies were. All I could say was, ‘Lord, please bring my babies back to me safely. Please, I beg thee,’” said Lutz.

 

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More about the author:

http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

Advice to Beginner Bloggers and Prospective Writers. By William Van Zyl. Published in December 2021.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-z8md6-1169742

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Read the full article here:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/12/05/advice-to-beginner-bloggers-and-prospective-writers/

Excerpt:

Answers to the questions and comments from blog readers. Five House Publishing.

I have received many questions from visitors to my website. The questions range from, How do I write good blog posts? I want to start blogging; where do I start? I would like to improve my writing and general blogging skills? Any advice?

To provide some advice and ideas on blogging and writing, I have reflected on my own journey over the past 3 to 4 years.

How I started off – publishing most of my academic work.

I started my writing and publishing about 3 years ago.  I received a year of study leave, and I had some extra time that year. So, I looked at all my academic work that sat on my computer. I took the first completed assignment and adapted it into an ebook. I used Canva – online graphic design software to produce attractive – front and back covers for my eBooks. I then taught myself to write short, exciting synopsis’ for all the eBooks. Then I published it to the D2D platform.

Sketches:

See the image of one of my ebooks on sketching and using watercolours. Read more about drawing with a fountain pen and watercolours in my blog posts. For example, My notebook and the benefits of sketching. Title: ‘Sketching regularly with a fountain pen and watercolours could change your life: Boosting your health, mental health and wellbeing.

See several sketches from the author’s notebook.

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Caption: Author’s sketchbook. The innocent and adorable Lulu with a glass of wine in her hand on the left and the strong, well-built Scarlett adorns the first page of my sketchbook. Practice, practice, and practice are key to mastering new techniques and ideas. Reference Page 69 & 85. 

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See the watercolour sketch in the blog post. Here is the caption. From my sketchbook – ink and watercolours (a quick sketch). Short story: Ancient Leviathan finally rolls over – 5000 fathoms under the sea – and reveals its secrets.

More stories and articles:

Five House Publishing: https://fivehousepublishing.com/

 

About the author: http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

 

 

 

Hickory, Dickory, Fig Tree – I ask of you – can you hear me? By William Van Zyl. Published in July 2021.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-gvr28-116868b

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Read the article as a blog post:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/07/07/hickory-dickory-fig-tree-i-ask-of-you-can-you-hear-me/

 

Excerpt:

From fun to research.

This fun rhyme – based on the well-known Hickory, Dickory, Dock – endeavours to get the reader’s attention to the animals and the tree talking. Playfully it wants to draw the reader in. But there is more, much more.

Could trees, plants and animals communicate? Could humans and trees communicate? We know that trees communicate with one another—above the ground and underground. These are some of the questions this article will touch on.

The unsuspected withering of a tree will also feature.

Science and Research: The Hidden Life of Trees

RESEARCH:

I want to tell you about the findings of plants and trees communicating, living life together – in communities – however, the forest scientist Peter Wohlleben does it perfectly. The story he shares of a ‘dead’ tree – found alive after about 500 years – is pivotal in his book.

Here is an image of a Kauri tree in New Zealand that refuses to die. Are other trees holding the ‘hands’ of this slain giant – nursing it for years?

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A kauri tree stump in a rain forest in New Zealand with sap flow sensors and other equipment attached. Essentially, Kauri trees “hold hands” beneath the ground, sharing water and nutrients through an interconnected root system. Credit: Sebastian Leuzinger. Sebastian, thanks for sharing this extraordinary picture! Reported by Laine Moger, Auckland General Reporter (NZ) – Stuff. Link: https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/114534612/this-kauri-treestump-has-stunned-the-science-world-because-it-refused-to-die

 

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See the freehand Sketch of the Mycorrhizal Network in the blog post. From the author’s sketchbook: Trees hold hands via the mycorrhizal network. It shows fine threads of fungi connecting surrounding trees. A communication system. See the mushrooms and the tiny threads that connect to the tree roots below the surface. Those mushrooms are the “fruit” of the fungus, while the majority of the fungal organism lives in the soil interwoven with tree roots as a vast network of Mycelium. Mycelium is incredibly tiny “threads” of the greater fungal organism that wrap around or bore into tree roots. Taken together, Mycelium composes what’s called a “mycorrhizal network,” which connects individual plants together to transfer water, nitrogen, carbon and other minerals. German forester Peter Wohlleben dubbed this network the “woodwide web,” as it is through the Mycelium that trees “communicate.” My Sketch was inspired by Dr Shannon Guichon.  From the University of British Columbia – Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences.

 

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More ebooks and articles are available at https://fivehousepublishing.com/

 

More about the author at http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

 

 

Tree-to-Tree: From the Lush Canopy – Underhanded and Ciphered – a Message to Thee. By William Van Zyl. Published in June 2021.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-sbg2d-11678c1

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Link to the article as a blog post – Five House Publishing: https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/06/26/tree-to-tree-from-the-lush-canopy-underhanded-and-ciphered-a-message-to-thee/

 

EXCERPT:

Trees: Survival of the Friendliest – not Survival of the Fittest

“Survival of the fittest” often brings to mind a notion that physical strength and power are crucial to survival, but that’s a misconception. Evolutionarily, the best refers to a species’ ability to reproduce and create an environment where its offspring can flourish. Scientists have found that cooperating and forming solid relationships is often essential to species survival, and it’s seen when we examine the evolutionary success of our human ancestors, apes, and even our dogs. For that reason, some might say friendliness actually beats out fitness when it comes to survival.

Trees are inherently friendly. The friendlier a tree, the better chances it has to survive. The book The Secret Life of Trees confirms the notion.  It opposes Darwin’s evolutionary theory of the fittest’s survival (natural selection). Wohlleben points out that trees communicate on many levels. They help one another. They feed each other in crises times; they warn one another via chemical and electrical pulses – insect attacks, and more. This new knowledge is a game-changer.

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Peter Wohlleben is the author of The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World (Photo: Tobias Wohlleben)

 

It is refreshing to realise that humans can prosper by helping others – just like trees.

Give, and it will be given to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, and running over will be put into your bosom. For with the same measure that you use, it will be measured back to you.” Luke 6 verse 38 New King James Version.

See the Red Mangrove from the sketchbook of the author. How would Mangroves communicate, considering their root systems and the surrounding saltwater? Environmentalists tend to think of mangroves’ ecological role mostly in terms of protection from storms and nurseries for fish. As climate change threatens to increase the frequency and severity of storms, mangroves provide a stout defence against storm surge. Mangrove roots also provide habitats for fish and shellfish, crucial to sustainable livelihoods for coastal communities.

So, as humans, what can we learn from trees?

Here are 4 simple things we can learn from trees standing together in the forest and under the same canopy.

  1. Humans should love their neighbouring trees as themselves. Give.

Humans should uproot greed, selfishness, and self-indulgence with a vengeance. A caveat here, we should grow entrepreneurs with an unselfish character. This starts in schools and in the shaping of a nation’s culture. The leaders have to model the way. For example, when a wealthy prime minister or president takes the lead by giving their salary — or half their salary — away to a charity. If they are rich and they can afford it. What a lofty and magnificent ‘tree.’

  1. It is not about the fittest surviving and eliminating the weak.

Think about an assumable ‘dead stump’ in the forest supported by surrounding trees for hundreds of years. We should look after our weak, frail, and special needs neighbours. Not the evolution model — for example, Darwinian theories — where the fittest survives at all cost. But, the Christian model:

Romans 13: verse 8 to 10

  1. Let no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for whoever loves others has fulfilled the law. 9. The commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You shall not covet,” and whatever other command there may be, are summed up in this one command: “Love your neighbour as yourself.” 10. Love does no harm to a neighbour. Therefore, love is the fulfilment of the law.
  2. Alert others and stand up for what is right — fight the rot.

When damaging insects — or large herds of animals — attack a tree, the tree involved will alert the surrounding trees using a scented message. We should look out for one another. Show love, care and offer discreet advice to our neighbours. For example, receiving bad news and pandemics affects people and their income.  Other attacks on ‘trees’ could be family violence, addictions, mental health issues, and more.

You are the salt of the earth – fight the rot.

  1. Share, support, and serve.

Trees are unselfish. They give; they support surrounding trees. They know they are stronger together. They will survive longer if they work together. The tree-culture of sharing is terrific.

Ephesians 4 verse 28

Anyone who has been stealing must steal no longer but must work, doing something useful with their own hands, that they may have something to share with those in need. New International Version.

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More about the author: http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

Odourless Poison Saves Murderer from Prison. By William Van Zyl. Published in December 2021.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-eunhq-1166dde

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Excerpt:

“The coroner will be here soon,” said Doctor Jonathan Reeves.

Her long-time best friend Joanna Cowley takes a tissue and dab extra-dry tears away below her eyes. The tissue is dry, bone dry.

“Oh, I will miss her. I loved her so much. She was such a caring and loving friend,” sobbed Joanna.

“We will all miss her and her millions of readers.”

“Her diabetes must have caught up with her in the end,” said Joanna.

“She asked me to accompany her on the cruise. I gave her insulin intravenously. Twice a day – morning and evening. I am not sure what happened.”

“It was so sudden. We had a lovely meal together last night. I am so glad Talita and I had the opportunity to spend the last night with her. We are shocked!”

“We are all shocked. I have no idea why she passed. I have run some basic tests. There is no indication. The only thing that I detect is that she suffered a heart attack and kidney failure.”

“Poor thing. She died while she was alone. There was no one to help her.”

———————–0————————–

“Kidney failure is the cause of death,” said the coroner as she signed the death certificate.

“Jane O’Connor died of kidney failure,” he confirmed.

———————-0————————–

The substantial cheque of 970,000 pounds – made out to Joanna Cowley – had been sitting in Jane’s safe for the last 3 months. The night she died, she must have placed it in her notebook.

When Joanna opened the notebook of Jane, the beautiful handwritten cheque fell out of the book.

“Thank you, Jane! Now I have my share of all your famous stories. Those were my stories you sold all these years,” she whispered secretly.

———————0———————–

In Sussex, a ghostwriter is writing the sequel of Jane’s book ‘The Midnight Lark.’ It is done behind closed doors. He had been studying the writing style of Jane for months now. The work of fiction is almost complete – ‘The Midnight Lark 2’. The black notebook of Jane is lying open on the writer’s desk – it is filled with many of her personal notes, diagrams, characters, and concepts – her authentic handwriting stares at the ghostwriter.

“When should we release the sequel novel?”

“I think we should publish it by the end of the year, in November,” said Joanna.

“We will split the profits, correct?” asked the ghostwriter.

“Yes, that was the agreement. This secret will stay with us and follow us to our graves,” said Joanna.

————————-0———————

“SEQUAL OF JANE O’CONNOR’S – THE MIDNIGHT LARK 2 – RELEASED!”

The exciting news is flashed all over the tabloids and news. The Londoner’s News date is Monday, November 7, 2016…….

 

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Read the full short story and article at Five House Publishing.

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/12/19/odourless-poison-saves-murderer-from-prison/

More about the author: http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

Tiger, Tiger, Tiger! タイガー、タイガー、タイガー!Nine unique lessons on the planning and attack at Pearl Harbour (WW2). By Wiliam Van Zyl – Dec 2021

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-cyjiw-115b17b

Introduction – Excerpt.

Weeks earlier.

A tiny reed protrudes out of the water – hardly visible – slowly moving from ship to ship. His eyes are wide open; his brain is making notes. He breathes slowly and carefully through the curved reed.

As Takeo’s body moves slowly through the transparent sapphire coloured water in the harbour, he sinks downwards, kicks, and then moves forward, constantly circling around the ships. The golden sand captures his shadow. The fishes know he is there. However, the US Navy has no idea that they are being monitored. The first thing that catches the spy’s eyes is the large metal-whales – riveted together, sheet upon sheet – lying calmly in the cool saltwater of Hawaii. The large destroyers and plane carriers float lazily in the bay; the smaller ships bob slowly up and down. They are at ease. The large propellers and rudders are resting, ready to awake at a moment’s notice

The sun forces its way through the shallow water and lights up the white sand that lines the bottom. A ray of light rests for a moment on the closest section of the destroyer close to Takeo, highlighting the silhouettes of the large US warship. He scans for nets and barriers that protect the ships from torpedoes and possible underwater sabotage. The nets and barriers are the first lines of defence against underwater torpedoes.

The moving reed started its spy-work weeks earlier. Classified intelligence is being relayed to the headquarters of Japan in Tokyo. Photos, sketches, and diagrams mixed with secret codes followed.

Takeo Yoshikawa is undetected….

 

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Credit: http://www.mybaycity.com/scripts/P3_V2/P3V3-0200.cfm?P3_articleID=10655

Excerpt:

 

8. Never put all your planes in one basket.

 

General Short, serving under Admiral Kimmel – the US commander in Hawaii – was obsessed with the idea that sabotage by agents in the islands’ Japanese community posed the greatest threat to their air force. He ordered that all aircraft be lined up wingtip to wingtip on their airfields. This combination of planes would make them easier to protect. All the ammunition was centrally stored and guarded.

 

On the morning of the attack, the planes – grouped beautifully together – made the perfect target for the Japanese fighter planes. The Japanese bombs shredded the wing-to-wing parked planes of the Americans with devastating results. Wiping out and crippling about 300 US planes during the attack.

 

Placing all your planes in one basket means you could lose it all. Like in business, look at different baskets. You never know what can happen! Think strategically; view all possible options.

 

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Above, SB2U Vindicators were lined up at the outer edge of Ewa Marine Corps Air Station in 1942, parked wingtip to wingtip for security against sabotage. In the distance are the slopes of the Waianae mountains. Below, planes were lined up at Hickam Field in an undated photo. Credit: https://www.staradvertiser.com/2016/11/30/hawaii-news/u-s-aircraft-and-fighters-were-sitting-ducks/

 

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More eBooks and articles are available at https://fivehousepublishing.com/

 

More about the author at http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

 

Novella by the author: Based on Pearl Harbour facts.

‘The Encoded Pen’

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Link to ebook: https://fivehousepublishing.com/product/the-encoded-pen/

 

 

 

Silver Chopsticks Miraculously Save Dong-Hyun’s Life. By William Van Zyl.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-a6m27-1148599

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Read the story online as a blog post: https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/12/02/silver-chopsticks-miraculously-save-dong-hyuns-life/

Excerpt:

The grey and blue coloured nutrient-rich placenta swirled around in the large glass bowl before it fell into a small hole with a soft thud. The bloodied mass pulled the severed umbilical cord into the hollow at the base of the Honey Apple tree like a Renault’s suspension coil spring. The coiled cord stretched and then collapsed on top of the mass. The last of the beautiful rich-red blood plasma dripped into the hole.

 

————0————

 

A newborn baby cried of hunger in a room. The tiny house, close to the apple, tree woke up. The inexperienced mum is at his side, comforting her baby with loving words.

 

‘My little one, my sweet baby, are you hungry?’

 

The little one grabbed the nipple with his spout-shaped searching mouth. After scanning like a heat searching missile, he struck milk. Dong-Hyun’s tiny wee mouth suckles with the force of a breast pump. A small stream of milk runs down the side of his cute mouth and over the soft, tender skin of his loving mother…..

Excerpt 2:

The practices around birth and the placenta: Exploring the beliefs of the different cultures from around the world:

 

“In 2010, medical anthropologists Daniel Benyshek and Sharon Young studied placenta traditions across 179 societies1. Among the 109 communities that held placenta rituals, there were 169 different disposal methods, including burial, incineration, placement in a specific location, or eating the placenta. Many cultures believe that the placenta is a close relative to the child and attribute human qualities to the placenta. Ancient Egyptians and other cultures believed that the placenta was the child’s secret helper or guardian angel2. In Cambodia, the placenta is considered to be the origin of the baby’s soul. Therefore, the burial place is surrounded by spiked plants to protect the baby’s soul from evil spirits3. In many traditional communities, people believe that the condition of the placenta will predict the child’s future skills and abilities. Also, it is believed that improper handling of the placenta can affect the health of the mother or the child. Thus, rituals for the handling of the placenta must be performed precisely and with great care. Many of these rituals involve washing the placenta in a special liquid, wrapping it within certain fabrics or plants, placing it in a specific vessel, and burying the placenta in an appropriate location. Quite a few cultures believe that it is important to pick an auspicious place to bury the placenta. In Turkey, if parents wish their child to be devout, they bury the placenta in the courtyard of a mosque, whereas if they want their child to care for animals, they bury it in a stable4. In Malaysia, after the placenta is prepared with salt and tamarind, it is buried along with books and pencils under the doorway of the child’s house. The Malay believe that following this tradition will ensure that the child will be hardworking and a good student5. But in Ukraine, the beliefs were the opposite: the midwife must not bury the placenta in a doorway or any place where it would be stepped over, or the mother would become infertile.

The Maori people of New Zealand use the same word for placenta and land: “Whenua”. They believe that the placenta burial symbolises the connection between the newborn baby and mother earth.

On the Indonesian island of Bali, the native tradition is to enclose the placenta in a coconut shell and hang it from a tree in the village graveyard. It is believed this will protect the child from illness and misfortune. The village of Bayung Gede has become a tourist attraction due to the hundreds of placentas hanging in its graveyard. Indonesia’s Ministry of Education and Culture declared the cemetery a national heritage site in Oct. 2020.”

Credit: Liat Ben-Senior. To learn more, visit https://parentsguidecordblood.org/en/news/honoring-placenta-different-cultures

 

 

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More about the author: http://williamvanzyl.com/

More stories, articles and resources at: https://fivehousepublishing.com/

 

 

Out-foxed (dramatised). A short story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-y4nr5-11407a5

Out-foxed (dramatised). A short story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

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Excerpt:

 

At 11:16 am, it was all over. On July 15, 2016 – at 11:17 am – John Parrish ran over his robber-friend, Jack Leonard, and grabbed his bag full of money. They had just robbed the Atlantic Bank in London. Four million and two hundred thousand British Pounds in total were collected. It vanished out of the large walk-in safe in just over 3 minutes.

The get-away car disappeared into the busy streets of London – two unknown men were dressed with tight stockings over their heads. Then, without their tight masks, they weaved through the traffic.

The two remaining bank robbers successfully evaded arrest and were not traced. The trail went cold…

 

Read the story and article online:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/10/03/out-foxed/

My shortest story of fiction to date – ‘a one-pager.’

Only 395 words were used. The whole story is on one page. My inspiration – the world’s shortest stories – is flash fiction.

A short story is a work of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting—usually between 20 minutes to an hour. A piece of fiction shorter than 1,000 words is considered a “short short story” or “flash fiction,” and anything less than 300 words is rightfully called “microfiction.”

 

How to Write Microfiction in 9 Easy Steps (less than 300 words).

  1. Make use of strong imagery. Let every single word count.
  2. Focus on one moment in time.
  3. Work with just one or two characters. Don’t spread your story too thin.
  4. Try first-person point of view first. Third-person and omniscient will also do.
  5. Surprise your reader with short bursts of action, concepts and ideas.
  6. Move quickly through your story.
  7. Show don’t tell. Leave lots of ‘golden nuggets’ throughout the story.
  8. Include a lesson or wisdom embedded in your story.
  9. Make good use of your title.

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Read more:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/

About the author:

http://williamvanzyl.com/

The Revolving Ballerina (dramatised). A short story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-gnhzv-114077d

The Revolving Ballerina.

A Short Story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

 

Read the story and article online:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/10/03/out-foxed/

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My shortest story of fiction to date – ‘a one-pager.’

 

Only 395 words were used. The whole story is on one page. My inspiration – the world’s shortest stories – is flash fiction.

 

A short story is a work of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting—usually between 20 minutes to an hour. A piece of fiction shorter than 1,000 words is considered a “short short story” or “flash fiction,” and anything less than 300 words is rightfully called “microfiction.”

 

My attempt at flash fiction with the prompt –  ‘After everyone had left, she did endless pirouettes on his grave’:

 

Credit: https://headstuff.org/culture/literature/20-micro-fiction-stories/

 

Here is the short story.

 

The Revolving Ballerina:

 

The ribbon of the blood-stained ballet shoes chafed Anne Lamington’s left ankle. It had been killing her for years…

 

 

How to Write Microfiction in 9 Easy Steps (less than 300 words).

 

  1. Make use of strong imagery. Let every single word count.
  2. Focus on one moment in time.
  3. Work with just one or two characters. Don’t spread your story too thin.
  4. Try first-person point of view first. Third-person and omniscient will also do.
  5. Surprise your reader with short bursts of action, concepts and ideas.
  6. Move quickly through your story.
  7. Show don’t tell. Leave lots of ‘golden nuggets’ throughout the story.
  8. Include a lesson or wisdom embedded in your story.
  9. Make good use of your title.

 

five_house_publishing_logo_-_picture6w2ai.jpg

See more at:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/

About the author:

http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

 

The Revolving Ballerina. A short story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-gnhzv-114077d

The Revolving Ballerina.

A Short Story by William Van Zyl (Oct 2021).

 

Read the story and article online:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/2021/10/03/out-foxed/

The_Revolving_Ballerina_-_front_cover8p8on.jp...

 

My shortest story of fiction to date – ‘a one-pager.’

 

Only 395 words were used. The whole story is on one page. My inspiration – the world’s shortest stories – is flash fiction.

 

A short story is a work of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting—usually between 20 minutes to an hour. A piece of fiction shorter than 1,000 words is considered a “short short story” or “flash fiction,” and anything less than 300 words is rightfully called “microfiction.”

 

My attempt at flash fiction with the prompt –  ‘After everyone had left, she did endless pirouettes on his grave’:

 

Credit: https://headstuff.org/culture/literature/20-micro-fiction-stories/

 

Here is the short story.

 

The Revolving Ballerina:

 

The ribbon of the blood-stained ballet shoes chafed Anne Lamington’s left ankle. It had been killing her for years…

 

 

How to Write Microfiction in 9 Easy Steps (less than 300 words).

 

  1. Make use of strong imagery. Let every single word count.
  2. Focus on one moment in time.
  3. Work with just one or two characters. Don’t spread your story too thin.
  4. Try first-person point of view first. Third-person and omniscient will also do.
  5. Surprise your reader with short bursts of action, concepts and ideas.
  6. Move quickly through your story.
  7. Show don’t tell. Leave lots of ‘golden nuggets’ throughout the story.
  8. Include a lesson or wisdom embedded in your story.
  9. Make good use of your title.

 

five_house_publishing_logo_-_picture6w2ai.jpg

See more at:

https://fivehousepublishing.com/

About the author:

http://williamvanzyl.com/

 

 

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